Showing 17–32 of 51 results

Feoniculum Vulgare

Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) is a flowering plant speciales in the carrot family It is a hardy, perennial herb with yellow flowers and feathery leaves. It is indigenous to the shores of the Mediterranean but has become widely naturalized in many parts of the world, especially on dry soils near the sea-coast and on riverbanks.It is a highly aromantic and flavorful herb with culinary and medicinal uses and, along with the similar-tasting anise, is one of the primary ingredients of absinthe. Florence fennel or finocchio is a selection with a swollen, bulb-like stem base that is used as a vegetable.Fennel is used as a food plant by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including in its native range the mouse moth and the Old World swallowotail. Where it has been introduced in North America it may be used by the anise swallowotail.

Fragaria vesca

Fragaria vesca, commonly called wild strawberry, woodland strawberry, Alpine strawberry, Carpathian Strawberry, European strawberry, or fraisier des bois, is a perennial herbaceous plant in the rose family that grows naturally throughout much of the Northern Hemisphere, and that produces edible fruits.Five to eleven soft, hairy white flowers are borne on a green, soft-hairy 3–15 centimetres stalk that usually lifts them above the leaves. The light-green leaves are trifoliate (in threes) with toothed margins. The plant spreads by means of runners (stolons).

Fraxini Ornus

Fraxinus ornus, the manna ash or South European flowering ash, is a species of Fraxinus native to southern Europe and southwestern Asia, from Spain and Italy north to Austria, Poland and the Czech Republic, and east through the Balkans , Turkey, and western Syria to Lebanon and Armenia. Fraxinus ornus is a medium-sized deciduous tree growing to 15–25 m tall with a trunk up to 1 m diameter. The bark is dark grey, remaining smooth even on old trees.The buds are pale pinkish-brown to grey-brown, with a dense covering of short grey hairs.The leaves are in opposite pairs, pinnate, 20–30 cm long, with 5 to 9 leaflets; the leaflets are broad ovoid, 5–10 mm long and 2–4 cm broad, with a finely serrated and wavy margin, and short but distinct petiolulus 5–15 mm long; the autumn colour is variable, yellow to purplish.The flowers are produced in dense panicles 10–20 cm (3.9–7.9 in) long after the new leaves appear in late spring, each flower with four slender creamy white petals 5–6 mm long; they are pollinated by insects.The fruit is a slender samara 1.5–2.5 cm long, the seed 2 mm broad and the wing 4–5 mm broad, green ripening brown.

Fumaria Officinalis

Fumaria officinalis (common fumitory, drug fumitory or earth smoke) is a herbaceous annual flowering plant in the poppy family Papaveraceae It is the most common species of the genus Fumaria in Western and Central Europe.It is an herbaceous annual plant which grows weakly erect and scrambling, with stalks about 10–50 cm long. It has londer, slender green leaves. Its pink 7–9 mm flowers appear from April to October in the northern hemisphere, or May to September in the UK.They are two lipped and spurred, with sepals running a quarter the length of the petals. The plant can have up to 20 flowers per spike. The fruit is a globe shaped, achene, which contains one seed. It contains alkaloids, potassium salts, and tannins. It is also a major source of fumaric acid.

Galega Officinalis

Galega officinalis, commonly known as galega, goat’s-rue, French lilac, Italian fitch, or professor-weed,is an herbaceous plant in the Faboideae subfamily. It is native to the Middle East but has been naturalized in Europe and western Asia. The plant has been extensively cultivated as a forage crop, an ornamental, a bee plant, and as green manure.G. officinalis is rich in guanidine, a substance with blood glucose-lowering activity at the foundation for discovering metformin, a treatment for managing symptoms of diabetes mellitus. In ancient herbalism, goat’s-rue was used as a diuretic. It can be poisonous to mammals, but is a food for various insects.

Helichrysum Arenarium

As a perennial plant, it grows to be an average of 0.3 m tall.The leaves are flat, the lower ones being elliptical in shape, while the upper ones are linear. They are wooly on both sides.The flower heads are arranged in loosely, a cross between umbel and panicle. They are 3 to 4 mm wide of bright golden yellow florets.It is found in Eastern France to Denmark as well as on the mountains of Uzbekistan on sandy grasslands, and heathland. It is also widely spread on the Dalmatian Coast in Croatia where locals regularly pick and sell it throughout the summer (weather permitting even as late as September and October).

Hypericum Perforatum

Hypericum perforatum is native to parts of Europe and Asia but has spread to temperate regions worldwide as a cosmopolitan invasive weed.The common name “St John’s wort” comes from its traditional flowering and harvesting on St John”s Day, 24 June. The genus name Hypericum is derived from the Greek words hyper (above) and eikon (picture), in reference to the tradition of hanging plants over religious icons in the home during St John’s Day, to ward off evil. Perforate St John’s wort is a herbaceous perennial plant with extensive, creeping rhizomes. Its stems are erect, branched in the upper section, and can grow to 1 m high. It has opposite stalkless, narrow, oblong leaves that are 1–2 cm long. The leaves are yellow-green in color, with scattered translucent dots of glandular tissue. The dots are conspicuous when held up to the light, giving the leaves the ‘perforated’ appearance to which the plant’s Latin name refers. The flowers measure up to 2.5 cm across, have five petals, and are colored bright yellow with conspicuous black dots. The flowers appear in broad cymes at the ends of the upper branches, between late spring and early to mid summer. The sepals are pointed, with black glandular dots. There are many stamens, which are united at the base into three bundles. The pollen grains are ellipsoidal.

Iris Germanica

Iris x germanica is the accepted name for a species of flowering plants in the family Iridaceae commonly known as the bearded iris or the German iris. It is one of a group of hybrid origin. Iris x germanica grows up to 120 cm high and 30 cm wide. It is a European hybrid, rather than a true wild species. The roots can go up to 10 cm deep and it is a rhizomatous perennial that blooms mid to late spring. It is known to produce the isoflavone irilone. Hundreds of hybrids exist representing nearly every colour from jet black to sparkling whites, except bright scarlet.

Juglans Regia Leaves

Juglans cinerea, commonly known as butternut or white walnut, is a species of walnut native to the eastern United States and southeast Canada.The distribution range of J. cinerea extends east to New Brunswick, and from southern Quebec west to Minnesota, south to northern Alabama and southwest to northern Arkansas It is absent from most of the Sounthern United States. The species also proliferates at middle elevations (about 2,000 ft or 610 m above sea level) in the Columbia River basin, Pacific Northwest; as an off-site species. Trees with 7 ft or 2.1 m (over mature) class range diameter at breast height were noted in the Imnaha River drainage as late as January 26, 2015.J. cinerea is a deciduous tree growing to 20 m (66 ft) tall, rarely 40 m . Butternut is a slow-growing species, and rarely lives longer than 75 years. It has a 40–80 cm stem diameter, with light gray bark.The leaves are alternate and pinnate, 40–70 cm long, with 11–17 leaflets, each leaflet 5–10 cm long and 3–5 cm (1 1⁄4–2 in) broad. Leaves have a terminal leaflet at the end of the leafstalk and have an odd number of leaflets. The whole leaf is downy-pubescent, and a somewhat brighter, yellower green than many other tree leaves.

Juniperus Communis

Juniperus communis, the common juniper, is a species of conifer in the genus Juniperus, in the famely cupressaceae. It has the largest geographical range of any woody plant, with a circumpolar distribution throughout the cool temporate Northern Hemisphere from the Arctic south in mountains to around 30°N latitude in North America, Europe and Asia. Relict populations can be found in the Atlas Mountains of Africa. Juniperus communis is a small coniferous evergreen or shrub, very variable in form, ranging from 10 m rarely 16 m tall to a low, often prostrate spreading shrub in exposed locations. It has needle-like leaves in whorls of three; the leaves are green, with a single white stomatal band on the inner surface. It never attains adult foliage. It is dioecious, with male and female cones, which are wind pollinated, on separate plants.The fruit are berry-like cones, initially green, ripening in 18 months to purple-black with a blue waxy coating; they are spherical, 4–12 mm diameter, and usually have three (occasionally six) fleshy fused scales, each scale with a single seed. The seeds are dispersed when birds eat the cones, digesting the fleshy scales and passing the hard, unwinged seeds in their droppings. The male cones are yellow, 2–3 mm long, and fall soon after shedding their pollen in March–April.

Laurus Nobilis

Laurus nobilis is an aromatic evergreen tree or large shrub with green, glabrous leaves, in the flowering plant family Lauraceae. It is native to the Mediterranean region and is used as bay leaf for seasoning in cooking. Its common names include bay laurel, sweet bay, bay (esp. United Kingdom), true laurel, Grecian laurel, laurel tree or simply laurel. Laurus nobilis figures prominently in classical Greek, Roman, and Biblical culture.

Malus Sylvestris

Malus sylvestris, the European crab apple, is a speciales of the genus Malus, native to Europe. Its scientific name means “forest apple” and the truly wild tree has thorns.Wild apple has an expanded crown and often appear more like a bush than a tree. It can live 80–100 years and grow up to 10 m tall with trunk diameters of 23–45 cm. Due to its weak competitiveness and high light requirement, wild apple exist mostly at the wet edge of forests, in farmland hedges or on very extreme, marginal sites. The tree is rather rare but native to most European contries. It occurs in a scattered distribution pattern as single individuals or in small groups.

Malva Sylvestris

Malva sylvestris is a species of the mallow genus malva in the family of Malvaceae and is considered to be the type species for the genus. Known as common mallow to English-speaking Europeans, it acquired the common names of cheeses, high mallow and tall mallow (mauve des bois by the French) as it migrated from its native home in Western Europe, North Africa and Asia through the English-speaking world. M. sylvestris is a vigorously healthy plant with showy flowers of bright mauve-purple, with dark veins; a handsome plant, often standing 3 or 4 feet (1 m) high and growing freely in fields, hedgerows and in fallow fields.  M. sylvestris is a spreading herb,which is an annual in North Africa biennial in the Mediterranean , and a perennial elsewhere .Three feet (one meter) tall,(3 meters has been observed in a wild or escaped from cultivation setting, and several cultivated plants of 2 meter or more in height) with a growth habit which can be straight, or decumbent,branched and covered with fine soft hairs or none at all, M. sylvestris is pleasing in appearance when it first starts to flower, but as the summer advances, “the leaves lose their deep green color and the stems assume a ragged appearance.

Matricaria Chamomilla

Matricaria chamomilla (synonym: Matricaria recutita), commonly known as chamomile (also spelled camomile), Italian camomilla, German chamomile, Hungarian chamomile (kamilla), wild chamomile or scented mayweed,is an annual plant of the composite family Asteraceae. M. chamomilla is the most popular source of the herbal product chamomile, although other species are also used as chamomile.M. chamomilla has a branched, erect and smooth stem, which grows to a height of 15–60 cm . The long and narrow leaves are bipinnate or tripinnate.The flowers are borne in paniculate flowers heads (capitula). The white ray florets are furnished with a ligule, while the disc florets are yellow. The hollow receptacle is swollen and lacks scales. This property distinguishes German chamomile from corn chamomile (Anthemis arvensis), which has a receptacle with scales. The flowers bloom in early to midsummer, and have a strong, aromatic smell.

Melissa Officinalis

Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis), balm, common balm,or balm mint, is a perennial herbalceous plant in the mint family Lamiaceae and native to South-Central Europe, the Mediterranean Basin, Iran, and Central Asia, but now naturalized in the Americas and elsewhere.It grows to a maximum height of 70–150 cm . The leaves have a mild lemon scent similar to mint. During summer, small white flowers full of nectar appear. It is not to be confused with bee balm (genus Monarda), although the white flowers attract bees, hence the genus Melissa (Greek for “honey bee”).The leaves are used as a herb, in teas, and also as a flavouring. The plant is used to attract bees for honey production. It is grown as an ornamental plant and for its oil (to use in perfumery). The tea of lemon balm, the essential oil, and the extract are used in traditional and alternative medicine, including aromatherapy. The plant has been cultivated at least since the 16th century, but research is still being conducted to establish the safety and effects of lemon balm

Mentha Piperita

Peppermint (Mentha × piperita, also known as Mentha balsamea Willd.)is a hybrit mint, a cross between watermint and spearmint Indigenous to Europe and the Midle East, the plant is now widespread in cultivation in many regions of the world. It is occasionally found in the wild with its parent species.Peppermint generally grows best in moist, shaded locations, and expands by underground rhizomes. Young shoots are taken from old stocks and dibbled into the ground about 1.5 feet apart. They grow quickly and cover the ground with runners if it is permanently moist. For the home gardener, it is often grown in containers to restrict rapid spreading. It grows best with a good supply of water, without being water-logged, and planted in areas with part-sun to shade.The leaves and flowering tops are used; they are collected as soon as the flowers begin to open and can be dried. The wild form of the plant is less suitable for this purpose, with cultivated plants having been selected for more and better oil content. They may be allowed to lie and wilt a little before distillation, or they may be taken directly to the still.